Long live single page website design! There’s something almost magical about small-scale websites that fit on a single page. They can be graceful, easy to navigate and provide optimal user experiences in a contained space.

While there was a time when we shied away from single page websites, users are embracing them again (thank you, mobile!) and you should, too.

We’re looking at ten tips, ideas, examples, and suggestions to help spark inspiration for your next piece of web design work. It might be just the right time to keep it simple, and embrace a single-page strategy!

1. Think in “Pages”

single page website

When it comes to designing a single, scrolling website design think in “pages.”

Each scroll should provide a page-like experience that focuses on a single element. This creates a distinct sense of organization and flow for the website design.

Cote does this beautifully with “pages” that have alternating light and dark (or full photo) separations. The user knows visually while scrolling where one bit of content ends and the next begins.

2. Timeline Navigation for Longer Pages

single page website

When it comes to one-page websites, they aren’t always light on content. Some of the best one-page designs are longer-scrolling, longer-format websites.

For these projects, consider timeline navigation so that users always know where they are in the content flow. It makes it easy to track where you are and how to get back if there’s content to re-examine.

UV Hero does a nice job of this with a highly visual timeline nav that shows each color on the visible light spectrum as it pertains to the content in the design. And the best part? You can click any color and jump right to that content.

3. On-Page Navigation

single page website

Single page websites don’t need to lack common user interface elements such as a menu, although many seem to.

You can still incorporate a traditional-looking menu (it can help user flow as well as search). The difference is that menu links jump to specific sections of the one-page design. For users that like to navigate in this manner, they won’t even know you’ve created this nifty trick.

Happy Tools looks like a multi-page site but it’s all contained on a single page. The menu works exceptionally well and gives users navigation choices.

4. Make It Highly Interactive

single page website

If you want users to keep scrolling, interactive elements can be the trick that encourages that action.

From video to parallax effects to touches of animation or gamification, interactivity can encourage greater movement and time on site. This is especially true with single page designs.

Lobods has a goofy style with plenty of interactivity. There are hover animations, slide- and pop-in elements and scrolling text. It all comes together in a way that helps users move through the content with ease. (Another bonus with this design? It includes plenty of space so that subtle movements and interactions are easier to see.)

5. All on One Screen

single page website

If you don’t have a lot of content, a one-page design that’s all on one screen can provide a nice user experience.

Treat this website design like a big navigational element with some information and then off-site or contact links. It can work well for coming soon designs or simple portfolio landing pages.

Sylvain Theyssens does this for their portfolio design. (It actually has two pages: A cute “screensaver style” animation that turns into the main design with a mouse movement.) The page is simple, informative and impressive. The one-screen design gives you everything you need to know without anything extra getting in the way.

6. Coming Soon Design

single page website

Speaking of coming soon websites, this is the perfect use for a single-page design.

In most instances, coming soon pages don’t have much content – maybe just a logo and intro or contact information. In most cases, this can fit well on one page and is an efficient use of user time until the main site goes live.

Green Chameleon does exactly this. The one=page design is especially nice because of the cool animation and interesting use of text. It creates a sense of anticipation and evokes curiosity – just the thing you’d hope for in a coming soon page.

7. Be a Little Funky

single page website

Single page websites can be an excellent playground if you want to try something a little bit different or funky. An unusual display works well with smaller designs because you don’t end up over-doing the “trick.”

Rou Hun Fan uses a specialty typeface and background grid to highlight his information, portfolio, and work. The creative display and minimal style are enough to encourage scrolling for a short time, perfect for a portfolio.

8. Give Users Something to Do

single page website

To keep engagement up and keep users interested in the design, give them plenty do to on a single page website.

One failure that many of these designs have is that they are just long scrolls of information. Break it up with clickable elements, calls to action and things to do. Not only will these elements help you figure out what users want from the design (and if they are meeting your intended goals) but will also help keep them interacting for longer periods of time.

Plethora breaks up a long page of scrolling with plenty of card-style buttons to reserve travel packages. Each of these click interactions is noted with an arrow to create a consistent user experience.

9. Keep it Organized

single page website

With all of a website’s content on a single page, it’s easy for the design to get out of hand. But it can also create an organized canvas for content.

When it comes to working with one page, a tight grid and uniform structure can be your best tools. Use them to keep content organized and grouped in a way that’s easy for users to navigate and understand.

Podcasts Repo does this well with a perfect grid of podcasts to choose from. The site is flexible enough with this grid and style to grow to as many content items as it needs without getting overwhelming.

10. Use Space Wisely

single page website

One of the most important design considerations for a longer-scrolling or one-page design is the use of space. Content needs to be spaced in such a way that content changes are clearly established, actions are identifiable, and everything is easy to read. (Remember, too much scrolling can start to cause some degree of eyestrain.)

Werner’s Nomenclature of Colours is a single page website with a lot of content. The site is actually a replica of a book from 1821. Space makes this design work.

Categories and subsections with a clear grid and plenty of white space enhance readability and scanning. There’s a lot here but it feels quite approachable thanks to the use of space throughout.

Conclusion

A single page website design can be just the thing you need to break up some of the heavier projects you’ve been working on. This style can work for anything from coming soon sites to portfolios. It’s appropriate for any website without tons of content.

 

Source: Design Shack

Whether you’re creating content for an established business or a startup, a company profile should be part of your plan. In this post, we’ll discuss what a company profile is, and how to write one.

A company profile can be an effective way to highlight the business to customers or stakeholders. And you’ll quickly find that it is a vital part of business communication.

It’s a way to state what your business stands for, what your goals are, and where you place your focus. As well as featuring all the practical information that anyone might need to know about your company.

What Is A Company Profile?

company profile

A company profile is a professional introduction to your business. It informs potential customers, stakeholders and the general public about your products, services, and business as a whole.

A company profile can be anything from a few sentences to an entire page on your website – most businesses have a long and short version – and is a good way to differentiate yourself from other businesses.

Why Is It Important?

company profile

A company profile is important for several reasons. It is a set of guiding words that describe your business.

Use it to shape how employees talk about your company and present a cohesive and consistent vision of the company to people outside of it.

A good company profile will get used frequently. These words can be copy and pasted into all kinds of other documents – grant applications, social media profiles, websites, professional directories and more.

A well-written company profile communicates three key things:

  • It persuades others to interact and engage with your company. The profile should entice people to learn more.
  • It includes contact information to build business credibility and tell people how to get in touch with your business.
  • It tells your company story and sets a vision for the future. It should mention where you’ve been and where you are going.

How to Write a Company Profile

company profile

When it comes to actually writing a company profile, start with a plan.

  • Outline a purpose. A company profile will get used in a lot of places. Outline what you want each audience to know and tailor the writing to match.
  • Pick a style that matches your brand. Your company profile should read like the other elements on your website. Use the same voice so it feels like it belongs to your company.
  • Highlight your mission and tell a story. A well-written company profile often has a narrative that makes people want to know more.
  • Include plenty of relevant information at a glance. While the company profile might include a few paragraphs of narrative, you can also use bulleted lists to highlight products or services or key company information. Also, make sure to include a block with contact information and links to your website or social media profiles.
  • Spellcheck and edit several times. Nothing is worse than a company profile with errors in it.

Once your write a company profile, you’ll likely edit to a couple of versions:

  • Long version for applications and business documents
  • Short version for quick introductions or descriptions
  • About us page on your website version that includes the full company profile
  • Tiny version for about lines in social profiles

Where Will You Use a Company Profile?

company profile

You will get a lot of mileage out of a company profile. The great thing about having this description written and ready to go is that you can make small tweaks to use it almost anywhere you need to post business information.

Using the company profile as a starting point will ensure that you post consistent business listings everywhere you provide information.

This includes in web and print materials distributed by your company, as boilerplate content for media and press releases, as descriptions for team members when they have speaking engagements, on social media in profiles for Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn, in job descriptions and applications, and anywhere you need to tell people about your business.

A company profile is an important element in your overall brand strategy.

Don’t Be Afraid to Design Your Own

company profile

While most of the focus is on writing a company profile, the design matters as well.

While you can’t always dictate what a company profile will look like, you can design it on your website or print pieces.

Don’t overlook this important part of your overall design. Too often, company profile pages are stripped down and look like an afterthought rather than a key element in the design. (Did you know that About pages are some of the most read on the web?)

Stick to trusted design principles when planning how company profile information will look.

  • Add visuals that relate to your company. Use images of products or services or team members in action.
  • Use white space to your advantage.
  • Format intentionally and use the same structure as the rest of the design.
  • Show off with testimonials, awards or fun company information.
  • Organize content into logical sections that are easy to read at a glance.

Conclusion

Every company – no matter how big or small – can benefit from having a strong company profile. This language will get used everywhere and helps establish consistent messaging for your company or brand.

Having a strong company profile will save you time and effort in the long run because you will have a set of guiding words that you can use time and time again to describe your business, product or service.

Source: Design Shack

The new identity designed by The Allotment features a “heart” motif referencing the airport’s location in the centre of the capital and uses a blue and green colour palette to broaden its appeal to a wider audience.

London City Airport has unveiled a “vibrant” new visual identity, which aims to appeal to a broader range of passengers and reinforce its position as an airport in the centre of London.

The rebrand comes as the demographics of those flying from City are changing. Traditionally geared towards business travellers, the airport says that between June and September last year, the proportion of those travelling for leisure exceeded those travelling for business for the first time ever, at a ratio of 52% to 48%.

The new look coincides with a £500 million four-year airport development programme, which includes new terminal facilities and aims to create space for more passengers and more flights from the airport.

The Allotment has given the airport a “contemporary” new brand identity, the studio’s managing director, Paul Middlebrook, says.

“The main aim of the rebrand is to reinforce London City Airport’s role as London’s most central airport,” says Middlebrook.

“It is really about the airport being at the heart of London and to reflect how it is now appealing to a mix of passengers, particularly leisure travellers.”

The new logo spells out the word “London”, with only one letter “O”, which has a heart shape in the centre of it. The letters are arranged in a plus sign shape, with “O” in the middle, “L” and “N” on the left and right, and “D” and “N” above and below.

It is coloured with a green and blue gradient, which changes diagonally from the top-left to the bottom-right corner. The words “city airport” appear on the bottom-right side of the main logo, set in all-capitals.

The typeface used in the logo is an adapted version of Gilroy, a sans-serif type, modified by The Allotment. Gilroy has also been used as the core brand typeface as it is “clear” and “familiar”, Middlebrook says.

The logo appears in a range of different formats — in some variations the heart and the words “city airport” appear in blue, and in others they are white.

The “vivid” colour palette aims to reflect elements found in the city, according to the airport, including bright green to reflect London’s parks, and blue to reference the River Thames, which the airport is located near to.

“London City Airport was built on the docks — it is very much connected to the Thames and to London itself,” Middlebrook says.

“East London is a very vibrant community now, it is one of the fastest growing areas in London and there is real buzz about it. We wanted to create an identity that reflects that dynamism,” he adds.

As well as aiming to broaden the appeal to more leisure travellers, Middlebrook hopes business travellers will also “appreciate the modern and dynamic nature” of the new brand identity.

It replaces an identity which said the words “London City Airport” in grey and blue, accompanied by a small blue image of an aeroplane.

As well as creating brand guidelines, The Allotment has also devised a new tone of voice for the airport, which aims to be “warm, caring, open and straightforward”, Middlebrook adds.

The studio worked alongside business consultancy The Storytellers, which defined the airport’s future vision and brand values.

A promotional film has been designed to launch the new branding by design studio Intercity, which includes footage of scenes from around London with the white heart-shaped icon appearing to “beat” in the centre of the video.

The clip also features an animated line drawing of landmarks on London’s skyline, including Big Ben and St Paul’s cathedral.

Design studio Intercity, has also created branded signage for the airport.

The airport’s website has been updated with the new look by consultancy Bright Innovation.

The new branding has been rolled out across digital touchpoints including social media and the website and will gradually be rolled out across airport signage and other physical touchpoints over coming months.

An outdoor advertising campaign created by design studio Cravens has also been launched to introduce the new look around London and on the airport site.

Previous London City Airport branding

Need a new logo? Whether you’re starting from scratch or just planning a tweak to a current mark, understanding shifts in logo design trends can help you create a design with a modern touch.

The big 2019 theme in logo design is to create something that’s just a little bit different. With so many new websites and brands and companies coming online almost every day, it’s no wonder that logos are trending toward designs that stand out.

Here’s a look at a few logo design trends for 2019, and how you can make them work for you (and while you’re at it, be sure to look through our full guide on how to design a logo!)

1. Small Serif Logotypes

logo design trends
logo design trends
logo design trends

A logo doesn’t have to be complicated to be elegant and effective. More brands are turning to small serif logotypes to portray who they are.

When we refer to small serifs, it’s less about the font size and more about the size of strokes used within the type family. This trend is exemplified by characters that include tiny serifs. They are simple, light and almost fall into the background of the lettering.

These serifs might be sharp or rounder and as with any logotype are a contributing factor in how the brand should feel to users.

Small serifs can be a great option because:

  • They are different. With so many sans serif logotypes out there, this style immediately stands out.
  • Serifs communicate a little more about a brand without imagery. These divots can establish mood and feel in a logotype where no other “art” is used.
  • These typefaces are interesting without being hard to read. While simple minimalism has been a trend for a while, there’s a movement toward somewhat more complex design elements.

2. Overlapping Elements

logo design trends
logo design trends
logo design trends

It’s one of those design rules that you don’t expect to be broken with small elements such as logos. But designers are breaking this rule … and it works.

From big brands like PayPal to smaller studios such as Moxy and Oust, logo designs are using elements that stack and overlap to create depth and visual interest. Overlapping styles tend to work best for logos that have a simple mark or lettering and that are contained to s specific part of the logo.

PayPal, for example, uses an overlapped letter for its iconic “P” but the word “PayPal does not use this treatment.

How do you use overlapping logo elements?

  • Pick one element to overlap; too much overlapping can get difficult to understand.
  • Use an overlapping element to create depth. Think about what the design technique does for an understanding of the mark.
  • Use color. This trending technique is made for high-color designs. (You might even consider an overprint style.)

3. Intricate Details

logo design trends
logo design trends
logo design trends

This logo design trend is a fresh take on visual elements after such a long period of minimalism – logos with intricate details.

From line-style logos has come an extension to more detail logos with plenty of varying lines, color variations, type choices and plenty of small elements that bring it all together.

This logo style can be a lot of work to create, but the result can be pretty amazing and creates a piece of art that more than a logo. A great intricate design can be used everywhere at any size and maintains that same level of interest.

These designs beg users to look and then continue to engage with the design, trying to see every hidden stroke and meaning to the brand mark.

Here’s how you use the intricate detail logo design trend:

  • Take care with color. Too much color in an intricate style can get overwhelming quickly.
  • Make every detail count. The design should not be complicated because it can; it should be complex and intricate because it should be.
  • Pair simple typefaces with complicated artwork for readable balance.

4. Lowercase Lettering

logo design trends
logo design trends
logo design trends

These logos would make e.e. cummings proud. The style features great typography in all lowercase characters.

With so many designers focusing on typography for their projects, the shift to a type-based logo isn’t that far-fetched. Using all lowercase letters is a little more unusual and can be an attention-grabbing solution.

The catch is whether this use of your brand or company name meets visual standards and usage.

Here’s how to make it work for you:

  • Use a beautiful typeface. Any old sans-serif won’t do here.
  • Amp up the contrast between letters and the background to ensure that the smaller stance is seen.
  • Take care with readability. Is the word clear in all lowercase letters?
  • Opt for a heavier weight. Lowercase letters have a little less heft and presence than title or uppercase options. Create that balance with a thicker stroke weight.
  • Give it plenty of room. Whitespace can add weight and visual interest to a simple lowercase logotype.
  • Try it with short and simple words. Too many letters or words without capitals can get a little cumbersome in terms of readability.
  • Don’t crowd it with other elements. Lowercase lettering is the design trick with this logo style. Avoid other effects to maximize its impact.

5. Simple Shapes and Lines

logo design trends
logo design trends
logo design trends

Use of geometric shapes and lines is another popular trend for design projects overall that’s rapidly becoming a logo staple. With clean lines, simple shapes and splashes of color, geometry is a logo must.

It’s important to note that many of these shapes are simple and fit into a square or circle format with uniform (or close to it) heights and widths. This initiative could be in part due to the need to have such a shape for common online mediums and logo usage, such as social media profiles.

Tips to make the most of the logo trend:

  • Don’t overthink it. A bold line or stroke can make simple lettering pop.
  • If you love the idea of a simple shape or geometry, but can’t quite make it work for the main logo, consider this treatment as a secondary option.
  • Give purpose to divots and shapes so that they frame or accent lettering, just dropping elements around a word isn’t quite enough to be effective.

6. Flat Design

logo design trends
logo design trends
logo design trends

Flat design remains a popular logo option because it is so easy to work with. While flat design as a whole is beginning to recede from the trends radar, logos are still using flat treatment.

Flat logos remain trendy because of how they are used. Many design projects feature full-screen video or images, particularly in website design, in full color. Flat logos often rest on a foreground layer and need to have some separation from the background.

Even brands that have more ornate logos often create a secondary, flat-style logo for this kind of use.

Going flat? Get the best result with these tips:

  • Use one or few colors in the design. Black or white options are the most popular.
  • Stick to simple typography that matches an icon or visual element in the logo.
  • Remember the basics of flat design and don’t feel tempted to add design techniques; simple is better if you want a logo that’s truly flat.
  • Consider a combination of a visual divot and text to tie the logo together.
  • Don’t overthink it. Often there’s not a lot of substance to a flat logo. The logo is often made to fall into the rest of the design.

7. Initials

logo design trends
logo design trends
logo design trends

LOL. OMG. SMH. It seems like the whole world talks in acronyms and initials these days. And logo design is no different.

While most commonly used for secondary logos, initials are everywhere. While there are three examples above, this collection could have easily included hundreds of designs with a three-letter (or less) logotype.

Most of these logos feature interesting or custom typography that’s designed to have a personal feel. The logo should speak right to the user and create an instant connection. The idea is further emphasized by the fact that the user needs to know what the letters actually mean (or have a desire to find out).

Here’s how you do it:

  • For designers or portfolio sites, use your initials to create a logotype that reflects your personality.
  • Add a simple animation to draw more interest to a logo that likely doesn’t carry a lot of visual weight in the design.
  • Consider boxing the letters so add more emphasis.
  • Acronyms and initials for logos are often secondary messaging and are subtle in placement and scale.

8. Circles

logo design trends
logo design trends
logo design trends

Circles are fluid and associated with energy, power, harmony, and infinity. And that’s why the shape is a trending logo design element.

Circles are also easy to plug into other places where a logo needs to appear, such as social media profiles and in corner locations on printed designs, such as business cards or letterhead. Like many of the other elements that are trending in logo design, circles have become a more popular shape in website design overall in recent months.

Here are a few tips for using round logo shapes:

  • Don’t force it. Some words and elements just don’t fit into round shapes.
  • Match the meaning of your brand and the shape. Do the associations match?
  • Use a circle with a harmonious color palette to create a sense of balance between the logo and branding.
  • Don’t get stuck inside the shape; consider elements that break through the perfect roundness of the shape.
  • Opt for lettering that goes outside of the circle, particularly if words are long. (Short words are less of an issue.

9. One Color

logo design trends
logo design trends
logo design trends

Aside from black or white, logos with a single color a wildly popular.

While it’s not something that you would jump to design, these logos are classically beautiful with a simplicity that showcases the associated brands well. By chance or maybe as a color trend of its own, each of the examples above features a one-color logo style that uses a variant of orange.

Tips for designing a one-color logo:

  • Think of the design as colorless. Even with black and/or white and one color, use will be much like a true single-color logo.
  • With only one color, the meaning of that hue will speak volumes. Be mindful of color choice.
  • Don’t force too much color. A small swatch in a subtle location can have an impact.
  • Add color in a way that means something. Does it make your logo, brand or product easier to understand?

Conclusion

Logo trends are interesting elements because, while what’s popular is always changing, logos are made to be constant. This creates an innate struggle for designers that are trying to create a logo that’s both modern and will withstand time. (It’s a pretty tall order.)

For the best chance at longevity, opt for a trend that includes some classic styling and is rooted in design theory. Design a logo that has a great aesthetic quality, is recognizable and readable and you’ll have the best chance at it lasting for years to come.

Source: Design Shack

Need a new logo? Whether you’re starting from scratch or just planning a tweak to a current mark, understanding shifts in logo design trends can help you create a design with a modern touch.

The big 2019 theme in logo design is to create something that’s just a little bit different. With so many new websites and brands and companies coming online almost every day, it’s no wonder that logos are trending toward designs that stand out.

Here’s a look at a few logo design trends for 2019, and how you can make them work for you (and while you’re at it, be sure to look through our full guide on how to design a logo!)

Small Serif Logotypes

logo design trends
logo design trends
logo design trends

A logo doesn’t have to be complicated to be elegant and effective. More brands are turning to small serif logotypes to portray who they are.

When we refer to small serifs, it’s less about the font size and more about the size of strokes used within the type family. This trend is exemplified by characters that include tiny serifs. They are simple, light and almost fall into the background of the lettering.

These serifs might be sharp or rounder and as with any logotype are a contributing factor in how the brand should feel to users.

Small serifs can be a great option because:

  • They are different. With so many sans serif logotypes out there, this style immediately stands out.
  • Serifs communicate a little more about a brand without imagery. These divots can establish mood and feel in a logotype where no other “art” is used.
  • These typefaces are interesting without being hard to read. While simple minimalism has been a trend for a while, there’s a movement toward somewhat more complex design elements.

Overlapping Elements

logo design trends
logo design trends
logo design trends

It’s one of those design rules that you don’t expect to be broken with small elements such as logos. But designers are breaking this rule … and it works.

From big brands like PayPal to smaller studios such as Moxy and Oust, logo designs are using elements that stack and overlap to create depth and visual interest. Overlapping styles tend to work best for logos that have a simple mark or lettering and that are contained to s specific part of the logo.

PayPal, for example, uses an overlapped letter for its iconic “P” but the word “PayPal does not use this treatment.

How do you use overlapping logo elements?

  • Pick one element to overlap; too much overlapping can get difficult to understand.
  • Use an overlapping element to create depth. Think about what the design technique does for an understanding of the mark.
  • Use color. This trending technique is made for high-color designs. (You might even consider an overprint style.)

Intricate Details

logo design trends
logo design trends
logo design trends

This logo design trend is a fresh take on visual elements after such a long period of minimalism – logos with intricate details.

From line-style logos has come an extension to more detail logos with plenty of varying lines, color variations, type choices and plenty of small elements that bring it all together.

This logo style can be a lot of work to create, but the result can be pretty amazing and creates a piece of art that more than a logo. A great intricate design can be used everywhere at any size and maintains that same level of interest.

These designs beg users to look and then continue to engage with the design, trying to see every hidden stroke and meaning to the brand mark.

Here’s how you use the intricate detail logo design trend:

  • Take care with color. Too much color in an intricate style can get overwhelming quickly.
  • Make every detail count. The design should not be complicated because it can; it should be complex and intricate because it should be.
  • Pair simple typefaces with complicated artwork for readable balance.

Lowercase Lettering

logo design trends
logo design trends
logo design trends

These logos would make e.e. cummings proud. The style features great typography in all lowercase characters.

With so many designers focusing on typography for their projects, the shift to a type-based logo isn’t that far-fetched. Using all lowercase letters is a little more unusual and can be an attention-grabbing solution.

The catch is whether this use of your brand or company name meets visual standards and usage.

Here’s how to make it work for you:

  • Use a beautiful typeface. Any old sans-serif won’t do here.
  • Amp up the contrast between letters and the background to ensure that the smaller stance is seen.
  • Take care with readability. Is the word clear in all lowercase letters?
  • Opt for a heavier weight. Lowercase letters have a little less heft and presence than title or uppercase options. Create that balance with a thicker stroke weight.
  • Give it plenty of room. Whitespace can add weight and visual interest to a simple lowercase logotype.
  • Try it with short and simple words. Too many letters or words without capitals can get a little cumbersome in terms of readability.
  • Don’t crowd it with other elements. Lowercase lettering is the design trick with this logo style. Avoid other effects to maximize its impact.

Simple Shapes and Lines

logo design trends
logo design trends
logo design trends

Use of geometric shapes and lines is another popular trend for design projects overall that’s rapidly becoming a logo staple. With clean lines, simple shapes and splashes of color, geometry is a logo must.

It’s important to note that many of these shapes are simple and fit into a square or circle format with uniform (or close to it) heights and widths. This initiative could be in part due to the need to have such a shape for common online mediums and logo usage, such as social media profiles.

Tips to make the most of the logo trend:

  • Don’t overthink it. A bold line or stroke can make simple lettering pop.
  • If you love the idea of a simple shape or geometry, but can’t quite make it work for the main logo, consider this treatment as a secondary option.
  • Give purpose to divots and shapes so that they frame or accent lettering, just dropping elements around a word isn’t quite enough to be effective.

Flat Design

logo design trends
logo design trends
logo design trends

Flat design remains a popular logo option because it is so easy to work with. While flat design as a whole is beginning to recede from the trends radar, logos are still using the flat treatment.

Flat logos remain trendy because of how they are used. Many design projects feature full-screen video or images, particularly in website design, in full color. Flat logos often rest on a foreground layer and need to have some separation from the background.

Even brands that have more ornate logos often create a secondary, flat-style logo for this kind of use.

Going flat? Get the best result with these tips:

  • Use one or few colors in the design. Black or white options are the most popular.
  • Stick to simple typography that matches an icon or visual element in the logo.
  • Remember the basics of flat design and don’t feel tempted to add design techniques; simple is better if you want a logo that’s truly flat.
  • Consider a combination of a visual divot and text to tie the logo together.
  • Don’t overthink it. Often there’s not a lot of substance to a flat logo. The logo is often made to fall into the rest of the design.

Initials

logo design trends
logo design trends
logo design trends

LOL. OMG. SMH. It seems like the whole world talks in acronyms and initials these days. And logo design is no different.

While most commonly used for secondary logos, initials are everywhere. While there are three examples above, this collection could have easily included hundreds of designs with a three-letter (or less) logotype.

Most of these logos feature interesting or custom typography that’s designed to have a personal feel. The logo should speak right to the user and create an instant connection. The idea is further emphasized by the fact that the user needs to know what the letters actually mean (or have a desire to find out).

Here’s how you do it:

  • For designers or portfolio sites, use your initials to create a logotype that reflects your personality.
  • Add a simple animation to draw more interest to a logo that likely doesn’t carry a lot of visual weight in the design.
  • Consider boxing the letters so add more emphasis.
  • Acronyms and initials for logos are often secondary messaging and are subtle in placement and scale.

Circles

logo design trends
logo design trends
logo design trends

Circles are fluid and associated with energy, power, harmony, and infinity. And that’s why the shape is a trending logo design element.

Circles are also easy to plug into other places where a logo needs to appear, such as social media profiles and in corner locations on printed designs, such as business cards or letterhead. Like many of the other elements that are trending in logo design, circles have become a more popular shape in website design overall in recent months.

Here are a few tips for using round logo shapes:

  • Don’t force it. Some words and elements just don’t fit into round shapes.
  • Match the meaning of your brand and the shape. Do the associations match?
  • Use a circle with a harmonious color palette to create a sense of balance between the logo and branding.
  • Don’t get stuck inside the shape; consider elements that break through the perfect roundness of the shape.
  • Opt for lettering that goes outside of the circle, particularly if words are long. (Short words are less of an issue.

One Color

logo design trends
logo design trends
logo design trends

Aside from black or white, logos with a single color a wildly popular.

While it’s not something that you would jump to design, these logos are classically beautiful with a simplicity that showcases the associated brands well. By chance or maybe as a color trend of its own, each of the examples above features a one-color logo style that uses a variant of orange.

Tips for designing a one-color logo:

  • Think of the design as colorless. Even with black and/or white and one color, use will be much like a true single-color logo.
  • With only one color, the meaning of that hue will speak volumes. Be mindful of color choice.
  • Don’t force too much color. A small swatch in a subtle location can have an impact.
  • Add color in a way that means something. Does it make your logo, brand or product easier to understand?

Conclusion

Logo trends are interesting elements because, while what’s popular is always changing, logos are made to be constant. This creates an innate struggle for designers that are trying to create a logo that’s both modern and will withstand time. (It’s a pretty tall order.)

For the best chance at longevity, opt for a trend that includes some classic styling and is rooted in design theory. Design a logo that has a great aesthetic quality, is recognizable and readable and you’ll have the best chance at it lasting for years to come.

Source: Design Shack

Christmas is nigh upon us. You’re likely rushing around like a crazy person this week trying to get all your work done, finish up your shopping, preparing to travel, etc. Let’s take a minute to slow down and absorb some solid Christmas-themed design inspiration.

In this post, we’ll take a look at over twenty-five clever and/or funny Christmas ads. Some will make you laugh, others might earn an approving nod or even a roll of the eyes. All are definitely worth a look and are sure to get your brain in a creative mode.

Calling All Santas

While the Grinch might be a familiar theme this season, the most popular character in Christmas ads is Santa Claus. The jolly old elf – and derivatives – easily evokes holiday emotions.

Stylish Santa for Jupiter Gentleman’s Threads

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Giver Viacci Travel

christmas ads

McDonald’s Santa

christmas ads

Cairo Festival

christmas ads

Construction Santa

christmas ads

Omino Bianco Laundry Santa

christmas ads

Feeling Grinchy

The Grinch has been a character of the holiday season since the original animated film, “Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas!” came out in 1966. The character is known for his antics and hate for the holiday at the start of the movie. This season the character is being revived in a new film and is a mainstay in Christmas advertising.

The Grinch for Wonderful Pistachios

christmas ads

Grinch Billboards

christmas ads

Window World

christmas ads

Christmas Trees and Decorations

Sometimes the most clever print ad designs from the holiday season focus on elements that everyone recognizes, such as Christmas trees and decorations. These ads bring together a different spin on holiday traditions and gift-giving.

Black and Decker Christmas Tree

christmas ads

Carla Christmas Tree

christmas ads

Red Cross Stocking

christmas ads

Stihl Christmas Tree

christmas ads

Christmas Pencil

christmas ads

Christmas Pets

Animals are a common character in Christmas print promotions – maybe it is the cute factor. These animals are sure to grab your attention and pull your giving spirit.

Shave-a-Thon Christmas

christmas ads

Champion Pet Food Christmas Adoption

christmas ads

Christmas Songs

christmas ads

Simple Christmas Connections

Sometimes the smallest hint of the holidays in concert with brand identity can be the perfect marriage of elements. Creating a holiday theme that’s not so overtly holiday is a craft in itself. (And it seems like beer brands have this technique mastered.)

Heineken Mistletoe

christmas ads

AB InBev Merry Christmas

christmas ads

Interesting Artwork

Combining elements and imagery that’s a little unexpected is a common advertising tactic. That is just as applicable in the holiday season.

Reinbeer

christmas ads

CADD Don’t Drink and Drive

christmas ads

Dylon Clothes Dye

christmas ads

BMW Jingle Bells

christmas ads

Kmart Jingle Joes

christmas ads

Pirates of Christmas

christmas ads

Source: Design Shack

This collection of the best modern stationery templates gives you a way to showcase your brand or identity in a realistic setting. Show off your company image, and deliver branding mockups in an authentic and professional way.

We’ve gathered a variety of stationery templates that contain a number of useful branding items — envelope designs, business cards, invoices, letterheads and many others. These beautiful templates are comprised of fully editable files. Your brand will never have looked as good!

Minimal Stationery Design Template

Minimal Stationery Design Template

This bundle of minimalist stationery templates is perfect for designing all kinds of branding related stationery as it comes with plenty of space for adding your own unique branding elements and graphics. It includes a business card, a letterhead, envelope, and a presentation folder.

  • Price: Envato Elements Subscription

FlatKitchen – Stationery Design Template

FlatKitchen Stationery Design

This stationery template features a branded design most suitable for a food-related business, restaurant, hotel, or an agency. It features a creative mascot and a logo template as well as A4 flyer, trifold brochure, social media banners, Keynote and PowerPoint presentations, and much more.

  • Price: Envato Elements Subscription

Stationery Corporate Identity Template 004

Stationery Corporate Identity 004

An elegantly designed stationery templates pack made for corporate identity designs. This bundle comes with a set of templates for creating a unique envelope front, business card, a presentation folder, and a letterhead.

  • Price: Envato Elements Subscription

Business – Stationery Template 23

Business - Stationery Template 23

Another set of beautifully designed stationery templates for small businesses and agencies. These templates come to you in both Photoshop and Illustrator formats to let you easily customize them using your favorite software.

  • Price: Envato Elements Subscription

Colorful Pattern Stationery Templates

Colorful Pattern Stationery Templates

This bundle of stationery templates comes with an envelope design, letterhead template, business cards, and a presentation folder templates. You can edit them using Illustrator to change text, fonts, and colors as well.

  • Price: Envato Elements Subscription

Minimal Modern Stationery Template

Minimal Modern Stationery Template

An elegantly designed set of stationery templates for modern businesses and agencies. This bundle includes a business card template, letterhead, envelope, and a presentation folder template. All in PSD format.

  • Price: Envato Elements Subscription

Stego – Stationery Set & Invoice Templates

Stego Stationery Set & Invoice Templates

This is a complete bundle of stationery template that allows you to cover all aspects of brand stationery needs. It includes a letterhead, invoice template, business card, folders, postcards, and much more.

  • Price: Envato Elements Subscription

Minimal Pastel Stationery Design Template

Minimal Pastel Stationery Design Template

A minimalist stationery template pack featuring elegant pastel colors. This bundle includes business cards, letterheads, and more creative templates for creating an identity for a creative agency or a small business.

  • Price: Envato Elements Subscription

Mosai – Minimal Stationary Corporate Identity

Mosai - Minimal Stationary Corporate Identity

Mosai is a pack of minimalist stationery templates that are made specifically for creating corporate and business branding identities. It includes a business card templates, letterhead, presentation folder, and an envelope template.

  • Price: Envato Elements Subscription

Olive – Identity Stationery Template

Olive - Identity Stationery Template

This creative and modern set of branding identity templates is perfect for creating stationery for creative businesses, fashion and apparel businesses, and agencies. You can also easily edit the templates using Illustrator as well.

  • Price: Envato Elements Subscription

Green Ecologic Stationery Template

Green Ecologic Stationery Template

A set of beautifully designed stationery templates. This bundle includes a complete set of branding templates for creating stationery for green and environmental businesses and organizations.

  • Price: Envato Elements Subscription

Cool Modern Colorful Stationery Template

Cool Modern Colorful Stationery Template

A collection of modern stationery templates featuring creative geometric shapes and designs. This pack includes a letterhead design, envelope, business cards, and more.

  • Price: Envato Elements Subscription

Creative Retro Invoice Template

Creative Retro Invoice Template

This is a creative template you can use to design a professional looking invoice for your business. It comes with a retro-modern design and comes in AI, PSD, and Word formats.

  • Price: Envato Elements Subscription

Branding Identity Stationery Templates

Branding Identity Stationery Tempaltes

A complete bundle of brand identity stationery templates. This pack includes all the templates for creating letterheads, envelopes, business cards, invoices, CD covers, and more.

  • Price: Envato Elements Subscription

Set of Brochures Stationery Templates

Set of Brochures Stationery Templates

This stationery templates pack includes several unique template designs for creating brochures, business cards, and flyers. It’s most suitable for product-related promotions and branding work.

  • Price: Envato Elements Subscription

Minimal Clean Invoice Template

Minimal Clean Invoice Template

This minimalist invoice template comes in A4 size and you can edit it using Illustrator. The template is easily customizable and features well-organized layers.

  • Price: Envato Elements Subscription

Modern Geometric Pattern Stationery

A complete set of stationery templates for creating a brand identity. It includes a letterhead, business card, envelope, and presentation folder templates. The templates come in both Illustrator and EPS file formats for easy customization.

  • Price: Envato Elements Subscription

Minimal Proposal Template

This is a minimalist template designed for creating beautiful project proposals for brands and businesses. It’s a 22 custom page document in A4 size. In addition, it also includes a business card template, letterhead, flyer, and more templates.

  • Price: Envato Elements Subscription

Databox Stationery Corporate Identity + Logo

This is a pack of stationery templates designed for creating a stylish corporate identity. It includes a letterhead, business card, a logo template, and much more.

  • Price: Envato Elements Subscription

Modern Project Proposal

A yet another project proposal template that includes plenty of graphical elements such as infographics, timelines, shapes, and more. It’s a 40-page document that can be edited with InDesign or MS Word.

  • Price: Envato Elements Subscription

Berry Invoice

A gorgeous invoice template with a modern design. This template is perfect for both corporate businesses as well as creative agencies. It also comes in 4 different color schemes as well.

  • Price: Envato Elements Subscription

Modern Stationery Template

This pack of stationery templates features a colorful design that makes it perfect for a marketing agency or a creative business. It includes a letterhead template, business card, envelope, and a presentation template as well.

  • Price: Envato Elements Subscription

Company Proposal Template

A project proposal template that you can use to showcase many different types of projects and case studies. It includes an 18-page document template, which can be edited in both InDesign and MS Word.

  • Price: Envato Elements Subscription

Black and Yellow Corporate Identity Template

This is a complete bundle of templates for creating a corporate identity. It includes many different types of templates, including letterhead, envelope, CD label, pen, notepad, and much more.

  • Price: Envato Elements Subscription

Minimal Invoice Template

Another minimalist invoice template for businesses and personal use. This template also comes in 4 different color versions and in A4 and US Letter sizes.

  • Price: Envato Elements Subscription

Project Proposal Template

This project proposal template includes a 32-page document template in A4 and US Letter sizes. You can customize it with either InDesign or MS Word. It also comes with an invoice template as well.

  • Price: Envato Elements Subscription

Web Design Proposal

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A web design proposal for a web designer or developer, that’s simple and easy to use and edit.

  • Price: $15

Stationery Set Editorial & Fashion

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Noemi set is a contemporary business stationery set including basic brand identity elements: business card, letterhead, thank you card, postcard flyer and gift voucher available in standard sizes. It’s perfect for creative or fashion brands who aim to re-fresh their brand presence and convey delicate professionalism. Clean layout, featuring editorial typography and nude color palette reflect the latest in design trends.

  • Price: $27

Corporate Stationery Vol 1

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Corporate stationery is made in a modern style with trendy elements. It can be used both for the company and for personal use. All elements are grouped and properly organized. You can modify them by one click, and easily change colours.

  • Price: $12

Proposal Template

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A clean business proposal for multi-purpose use, with quality design, and a clean, professional look.

  • Price: $15

Media Kit Template

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A media kit is a quick snapshot of your blog/website’s services, statistics, viewer demographic, and social following. Having a clean, polished kit is the perfect way to promote your hard work to potential sponsors and collaborators.

This media kit design is a fully editable, Photoshop (.PSD) and InDesign (.INDD & .IDML) template that’s great for both up-and-coming and seasoned bloggers. With this template, you will be able to easily update the type and color palette to match your brand (or keep it as-is!) and add your own images.

  • Price: $15

Corporate Letterheads Bundle

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This package contains three templates for corporate and creative letterheads that can be used for both personal use and for use within the company.

  • Price: $13

Corporate Stationery Volume Bundle

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Corporate stationery is made in a modern style with simple and trendy elements. It can be used both for the company and for personal use. All elements are grouped and properly organized. You can modify them with one click!

  • Price: $13

Noemi Stationery Set Editorial & Fashion

noemi_standing-o

Noemi is a contemporary business stationery set including basic brand identity elements: business card, letterhead, thank you card, postcard flyer and gift voucher available in standard sizes. It’s perfect for creative or fashion brands who aim to re-fresh their brand presence and convey delicate professionalism.

  • Price: $27

Professional Time Estimate

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A one page time estimate template with fully customizable layers and print ready formats.

  • Price: $5

Multipurpose Certificate

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This premium multipurpose certificate template comes in Word, AI, EPS, PSD, and PDF versions. This template is fully customizable and ready to print. A help file is included with the main file.

  • Price: $6

Brand Guidelines 20 Pages

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A 20 page brand & logo guidelines template, with real wording.The format is A4 (210×297mm) with 3 mm bleed and US letter (8.5×11 inches) with 0.125 inches bleed all around. The files are fully editable and print ready.

  • Price: $15

Docx Business Corporate Invoice

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This listing is for a modern and elegant corporate business invoice template for MS Word (docx). The product is very easy to edit with MS Word program. Our products are intended to those who do not want to use sophisticated and complicated programs to create and refresh their invoice.

  • Price: $5

Jogja Simple Proposal Template

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A clean business proposal for multi-purpose use, with quality design — clean, professional, and modern. Completely editable, print ready, with easy text replacement.

  • Price: $5

Retro Corporate Identity

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A clean, creative and high quality corporate identity package. Suitable for any kind of business, each template is fully customizable and comes in a well organized PSD file.

  • Price: $3

Professional Web Proposal Template

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This is a modern, professional and very useful template for a business proposal. Perfect for areas like web design, online advertising and similar. It contains 16 pages to create your best proposal.

  • Price: $13

Chef – 3PG Media Kit Template

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Blogger kit co. offers easy to alter, fully editable media kits that come in a variety of styles. This is one for all the foodies out there!

  • Price: $17

Business Proposal Template

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A professionally designed business proposal that can be used for any type of business.

  • Price: $5

2 Pg Media Kit – Beauty Blogger II

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Our media kit templates are the perfect solution for the not-so-tech-savvy, and even those well versed in the latest design software. All you need is a basic knowledge of Microsoft Word, and you’re good to go.

  • Price: $15

Black & Classy Corporate Identity

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Although it has been made with business consulting in mind, this minimal though very classy corporate identity is suitable for any business.

  • Price: $14

Cosita Corporate Identity

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A standard identity pack for creative business. Included in the package is a business card, envelope, letterhead and presentation folder.

  • Price: $8

Clean Minimal Invoice

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This invoice will help you in your business to save time, organize you product data and customer’s info and easily generate the invoice by inserting the costumers ID and Items ID.

  • Price: $6

Pixeldot Stationery Pack

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A complete stationery pack with all the essentials including an invoice, letterhead, cover and other items.

  • Price: $12

Stationery Corporate Identity

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A geometric corporate identity pack that will suit any business. A modern and funky design!

  • Price: $12

Chroma – Stationery Set

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This set includes a plain letterhead, a 2 sided envelope and a 2 sided business card.

  • Price: $12

3 Colored Invoice Template

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A minimal three colored invoice template that you can easily edit to your needs.

  • Price: $6

Mio- Corporate Identity Pack

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A fully vector corporate identity pack for your creative business that includes all the elements required for a basic branding package.

  • Price: $10

Creative Project Briefing

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This set includes international A4 with bleeds, CYMK color mode, one page template that is fully organized into layers.

  • Price: $5

Polem Invoice Template

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A set of simple and clean invoice and project brief templates — super simple, with focus on clear typography.

  • Price: $5

Business Invoice Template

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A minimal green themed business invoice template with all elements included for a professional invoice.

  • Price: $6

AudioTeq Modern Identity Plus Logo

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A multi-purpose, easy to customize and modern corporate identity/stationery for all sorts of businesses. One of the most exclusive, popular and premium corporate identity templates on the web.

  • Price: $15

Gold And White Corporate Identity

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A classy and high quality corporate identity package. Suitable for any kind of business, each template is fully customizable and come in a well organized PSD file. All text is editable and colors can be easily changed to what best fits you.

  • Price: $12

Apex – Stationery Set

This pack includes a letterhead, 2 sided envelope, 2 sided business card, layered PSD files, customizable and editable files.

  • Price: $12

Minimal Letterhead Template

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A simple unique letterhead for all kind of business and personal purpose usages. This file is easy to edit, modify and customize able. All files are well arranged, editable and easy to access.

  • Price: $5

Stationery Template Identity

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Beautifully designed identity template files, print ready for stationery. Design comes in minimal, professional and simple identity foundation.

  • Price: $10

Orange Brand Identity

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This pack contains beautiful orange themed identity templates for complete branding and advertisement.

  • Price: $10

Blue Themed Corporate Identity

6

A clean and attractive corporate stationery for any personal or commercial uses. This identity set will help you in your business to save time for all in one package, All of items are fully editable.

  • Price: $10

Pink Themed Corporate Identity

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A clean and attractive corporate stationery for any personal or commercial uses.

  • Price: $10

Red Corporate Identity

8

A creative and high quality corporate identity package. Suitable for any kind of business, each template is fully customizable and come in a well organized PSD file.

  • Price: $10

Creative Blue Theme Stationery

9

A clean and well organised stationery pack for your company. Very detailed and 100% editable. Free font used and ready to print template.

  • Price: $9

Simple & Clean Stationery

12

This pack contains layered 8 AI, 8 EPS files and 1 MS Word Files total 17 files with free fonts used.

  • Price: $8

Corporate Letterhead 6 with MS Word

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A corporate letterhead designed in 3 different color schemes with stylish design elements. You can easily change the logo, contact information and color of the element itself in just 1 click. This corporate letterhead can be used for absolutely any company or for personal use.

  • Price: $7

Corporate Letterhead 9 with MS Word

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A corporate letterhead designed in 4 different color schemes with stylish design elements. You can easily change the logo, contact information and color of the element itself in just one click.

  • Price: $7

Minimal Certificate Template

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A set of printable vector files with fully customizable features. Simple!

  • Price: $6

Olive Green Minimal Letterhead Template

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A simple unique letterhead for all kind of business and personal purpose usages. This file is easy to edit, modify and customize able. All files are arranged, editable and easy to access.

  • Price: $5

Simple Invoice Templates

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A simple unique invoice template for all kinds of business and personal purpose usages.

  • Price: $4

Elegant Business Word Invoice Design

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This is for a modern and elegant corporate business invoice template for MS Word (docx). The product is very easy to edit with MS Word — all our products are intended to those who do not want to use sophisticated and complicated programs to create and refresh their invoice.

  • Price: $5

Successia Business Proposal Template

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This Successia Business Proposal Template Design is useful for any type of companies. It is made with simple shapes, but looks very professional. Easy to modify, change colors, dimensions, get different combinations to suit the feel of your event.

  • Price: $2

Design Squad Premium Identity

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A multipurpose, easy to customize and modern corporate identity/stationery for all sorts of businesses.

  • Price: $15

Databox-Corporate Identity

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A corporate identity pack with a logo mockup for your creative business.

  • Price: $10

Bundle Corporate Identity Pack

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A set of three corporate identity packs for your creative business. Fully vector design with editable and resizable features.

  • Price: $15

20 Stationery Templates Pack

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It doesn’t matter if you’re a designer who has to create a stationery design, a marketing firm, a small business or a huge company, visual identity is one of the most important parts because it adds value to the company and shows its identity. It’s a key part in connecting with clients or potential partners.

  • Price: $10

Cipher – Stationery Set

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This pack contains the following contents: letterhead, 2 sided envelope, 2 sided business card, layered PSD files. Easy to customise, and print ready!

  • Price: $12

Devil’s Rocket Stationery

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The pack contains an envelope, letterhead (A4 & letter) and business card (front & back).

  • Price: $15

Rotex Corporate Identity

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A clean, sleek and modern design pack with unique look and feel.

  • Price: $7

Identity Mock-Up Design

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A minimal blue design template with easy to use features. The items included in this pack are letterhead (A4), business card, envelopes and corporate folder.

  • Price: $29

Simple Stationery Design Template

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A simple and clean stationery design template for your business.

  • Price: $7

Source: Design Shack

The official organisation for Girl Guides in the UK has overhauled its range of activities, including new skills such as coding, human rights and inventing, and has commissioned studio Red Stone to create a visual look for its 187 badges and corresponding handbooks.

Girlguiding has redesigned its badges and handbooks in line with a host of new activities that aim to be “relevant to girls’ lives now”.

The redesign has been completed by branding studio Red Stone, and is the biggest overhaul of badges for the charity organisation in over 100 years.

Girlguiding was founded in 1909 under the name The Girl Guides Association, and is the UK’s largest girls-only youth organisation. It has 100,000 volunteers UK-wide, and the aim is to encourage young girls and women to learn new skills, work as part of a team or as a leader, and complete projects for social or charitable causes. It is the UK-branch of the Girl Guides, which is a movement that operates worldwide.

Since it launched 109 years ago, girls who are part of the organisation have taken part in physical, mental, charitable and skills-based activities, from first aid to camping, sailing and orienteering, as well as some more niche hobbies such as circus skills and stargazing, depending on what their local Girlguiding unit offers.

Members are split into four age group sections: Rainbows, aged five-to-seven; Brownies, aged seven-to-10; Guides aged 10-14; and Rangers, or the Senior Section, aged 14-25.

The redesign sees a refreshed look and feel for 187 badges, plus the corresponding award books and handbooks for the four Girlguiding sections.

New activities have been added under six main themes: Skills for my Future, Have Adventures, Be Well, Know Myself, Express Myself and Take Action. New skills include storytelling, inventing, human rights, craftivism, animation, coding and festival go-ing.

According to Chris Davis, director at Red Stone, some of the important aims of the new suite of activities include introducing girls and young women to STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) skills, such as through animation and coding, and encouraging wellbeing and creativity, such as through storytelling.

The badge design aims to be “bright, friendly, exciting and something for members to be proud of”, says Davis. A broad colour palette of greens, purples, pinks, blues, yellows and oranges has been incorporated, as well as illustrated icons, all applied through stitching as the badges are made of woven textile.

The new style was developed following a consultation with 50,000 girls and young women from Girlguiding groups across the UK, as well as many who were not part of any group. They shared thoughts on which activities Girlguiding should offer, and offered feedback on the design of the badges, including colours, shapes and names of activities.

Davis says the main challenge was coming up with a visual language that was “appropriate to all age ranges”, while also “retaining consistency and charm”.

Another consideration was creating a style that made the woven badges feel permanent rather than disposable, he adds.

“People retain a very personal and emotional bond with their Girlguiding experiences,” he says. “The physical nature of the woven badges, which are sewn onto blankets, jumpers or sashes, are representative of memories, and they become keepsakes that are kept and treasured.”

The corresponding handbooks and awards books have mostly adopted the same colour palette and illustration style as the badges for Rainbows and Brownies, with a gradually more pared back visual style for the Guides and Rangers. The Rangers’ books feature far more photography, fewer bright colours and more copy.

Through the new activities and badges, Red Stone hoped to create a “fresh and inspiring visual approach that is relevant to girls’ lives now”, says Davis.

The new badges and corresponding guide handbooks and award books are currently rolling out across Girlguiding groups nationwide.

Source: Design Week

A new, independent magazine celebrating classic graphic symbols has launched, based on a popular Instagram account created by a London-based designer.

In 2015, freelance graphic designer Richard Baird started an Instagram account to share his love for some of the best and most thoughtfully conceived logos of the mid-20th century.

Using a colour palette of black-and-white, and only featuring symbols with no accompanying brand names or logotypes, LogoArchive looked to spread the beauty and joy of historic identities by stripping them of all other assets and context.

Three years later, the LogoArchive account has grown in popularity and reached 122,000 followers. Then following a recent trip to Somerset House’s current exhibition on independent print magazines, Baird decided to immortalise the concept in print form.

“Seeing all the different formats at Print! Tearing it Up got me really fired up, and reconfigured the way I thought about independent publishing,” he says. “That it didn’t need to be excessive, but thoughtful and well-crafted.”

LogoArchive is now a quarterly, print magazine, published independently by Baird and printed by WithPrint, which will complement the existing Instagram account. After his visit to the exhibition, the first issue of the magazine was conceived, designed and sent to print in one day.

“This explores how we can reduce the distance between passion, conception and creating a material object,” says Baird. “Less things get in the way when we do it like this. Sure, mistakes can be made, but it is a very personal piece of work, and I wanted to express this philosophy.”

The first issue, which is out now, features just 10 pages plus the cover, translating the online archive into print form, with a curated selection of logos from the 1950s-80s, and a bit of contextual information about them. Logos featured include a charming elephant created for Canadian construction company M.C. Equipment in 1975, and a V-shaped bird icon made for German fashion brand Vogel in 1965.

But there are plans to grow the magazine, says Baird, with an extra four pages for every new edition and increasing the volume and breadth of editorial content. The format may also be rethought, such as by including logos in a chronological order. It is unlikely to be prescriptive, he says, with each issue likely to be different in layout and length.

“I liked the idea of a zine rather than a book because it gives me the chance to reconfigure the concept and content, create an on-going relationship with readers and develop a story,” Baird says. “A single book demands a resolution, is inflexible and is already familiar in logo design archival. Changing the mode of delivery is enough to reinvigorate a subject, which is essentially what the Instagram account did back in 2015.”

The design of the magazine reflects the monochrome design of the Instagram account, with white ink set against black (ebony) Colorplan card, which is 135gsm weight, with black stapling.

“I originally opted for black-and-white on Instagram for three reasons,” says Baird. “To draw the eye in, to emphasise the language of form and shape over colour, and to differentiate the account. You can’t really own logo archival, so all you have is curation and presentation.

“I wanted to honour LogoArchive’s origins in colour through the print version, and also honour its new physical form through quality,” he adds.

While the printed quarterly version of LogoArchive lacks the unlimited space of the online version, Baird says this will give him the opportunity to curate mid-century logos selectively for the various editions, be critical and make it a very personal project, while continuing to provide “inspiration” and spread “joy and immediacy” through his Instagram counterpart.

“I’d like readers of this zine to feel like they are buying into something unusual,” he says. “To show them that this is a total project, and hopefully inspire them to produce small zines of their own to share ideas and niche content, as many people did in the past. Hopefully this will show that it doesn’t need to be substantial or complete – it just needs to speak to people and have potential.”

The first edition of LogoArchive is available to buy online from Counter Print for £5, and is also stocked by Magma Books and MagCulture in the UK, and Standards Manual in the US. Baird, who currently works from Jack Renwick Studio’s space in London, worked with Withprint on the project.

Source: Design Week

The previously Virgin-owned trainline has been temporarily renationalised and taken over by the Government, and given a new name and identity to match by studio BrandCooke.

Virgin Trains East Coast (VTEC) has been rebranded as London and North Eastern Railway (LNER), following the collapse of the private franchise.

VTEC, now LNER, is a trainline which runs from London to Edinburgh to Inverness. It was operated by private companies Virgin and Stagecoach, but the companies could not meet their promised payments in their contract, allegedly caused by lower passenger numbers and revenue than was forecast, according to The Guardian.

Trainline now run by Government

The trainline has now been temporarily renationalised and will be run by the Department for Transport.

The Government department commissioned design studio BrandCooke to rebrand the company as LNER, which is a return to the original name used by the trainline nearly 100 years ago.

BrandCooke created a new identity for the trainline, which distinguishes it from the VTEC brand but keeps some design elements of it such as colour palette so that existing train livery and interiors do not need to be dramatically changed, says Gary Cooke, founder at the design studio.

Sharper “N” character

The new brand includes a red and white colour palette – reminiscent of Virgin Trains – used alongside the name LNER set in a sans-serif typeface, which is a bespoke version of Gotham.

The “N” has been elongated and given sharper points, and is used as a diagonal dividing device for colour, imagery and text.

Cooke says that the studio steered away from designing something with a “nostalgic, retro feel” that “railway aficionados may have loved” but would have been too similar to the First Great Western trainline rebrand to GWR completed in 2015 by Pentagram partner John Rushworth.

“To bring back the ‘apple green’ or ‘garter blue’ colour palette from LNER’s glory years, when interiors of the new VTEC fleet had already been agreed and produced, would have been a costly exercise,” says Cooke. “We had to make sure it transitioned smoothly from VTEC to LNER. Many of the new high-speed trains, which are coming in later this year, have already had their interiors and fabrics produced.”

Links back to Gerry Barney’s British Rail symbol

He adds that the “N” symbol in the new logo has a “directional” quality to it, which “subconsciously” harps back to the British Rail logo, designed by Gerry Barney in 1964.

The diagonal symbol is also used in the top right corner of posters and adverts, to further symbolise the North East.

The rebrand comes a few months before a new fleet of high-speed trains called the Azuma fleet are due to launch on LNER in December 2018, having launched on Great Western Railway (GWR) last year.

The Azuma trains were created and marketed under Virgin Trains, so Cooke has kept the name but integrated the pointed style of the new “N” into the “Z” in Azuma.

“Azuma is Japanese for East and by integrating the letter ‘N’ from LNER to form the letter ‘Z’ in Azuma, the logo spells out North East,” he says.

Illustrators to be brought in later

Stock photography has been used of various destinations. There was no time to commission illustrators and photographers due to the short time-span of the project, but this is something that could be pursued in the future, says Cooke, given the graphic design history of the original LNER, which featured illustrative posters between the 1920s and 1940s.

“We wanted the new brand to look bold and confident,” says Cooke. “We didn’t want the launch of LNER to be like sticking a plaster over the old brand – it had to be a well thought-through identity, and a really professional job.”

The brand guidelines have now been passed on to the in-house design team at LNER based in York, which will develop the brand with hopes to commission illustrators.

The new brand has now rolled out across station signage and advertising, such as at London’s King’s Cross and York stations, on marketing and print materials, digital platforms and merchandise. It is currently rolling out on train livery, but will launch in full on livery when the Azuma trains are launched later in 2018.